Friday, March 21, 2014

March 21, 1954 Europe Trip

Our travelers, Harold and Jean, are now enjoying a trip across the North Atlantic, having left NYC on Friday, March 19 for a two week trip to Naples.  The fare to Italy was $200.  The postcard below was written on March 21 but is postmarked March 27 in Lisbon. Transcription follows.

Saturnia and Vulcania were cruise ships of the Italian Line used as Hospital Ships during WW2 – here's a picture of them with their [red?] crosses from Shipspotting.com:

Vulcania in foreground and Saturnia in background

History from George Glazer Gallery which had paintings of the ships -- sorry, no longer available for purchase, but you can view them here:
The Saturnia and the Vulcania were built by Cantiere Navale Triestino in Monfalcone, Italy, and entered service in 1927 and 1928 respectively for the Cosulich Line. They sailed the North and South Atlantic. In 1932, Cosulich was merged with two other lines to form The Italian Line. Both ships survived World War II, and were returned to Italian service around 1946-47. They continued to sail into the mid 1960s, when two new ships replaced them. The Saturnia was scrapped and the Vulcania was renamed the Caribia and sailed for another line for several years, until it too was scrapped, in 1974.
Saturnia/Vulcania Cruise Ship c1950
Postcard to Catherine & Roberta from Daddy & Mommie
Postmarked Lisboa [Lisbon] March 27, 1954
Sunday, March 21, 1954
We are rocking back & forth like we are in a huge cradle Y we can see the rough sea thru the portholes. Daddy loves to go up on deck & watch the big waves wash over the ship.  The tables are anchored to the floor & some times you really have to hold on to keep from falling.  All our love, Daddy & Mommie

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HH adds that the fare from NYC to Naples was $200. An ocean voyage in the 1950s was not a "cruise," just a ship to get there.

1 comment:

Catherine said...

HH adds that the fare from NYC to Naples was $200. An ocean voyage in the 1950s was not a "cruise," just a ship to get there.

Items from Uible photo album